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domenica 29 marzo 2015

Interview with Eddy Bogaert







q)Walk us through an intimate day in your life




a)" well, I don't know how intimate You want me to be ...but let me walk you inside the rabbit hole, but be warned im not going to keep it PG-13. 
It's winter time in New York City and its awful, it's so cold outside that dogs stick to the fire hydrants. Nevertheless, the show must go on. At the studio I turn up the heart to full blast, which at times feels like it's not warm enough. Grab a cub of coffee, some times I'll add some sambuca or baileys depending on the mood, and look at the canvas and start really going at it. then I'll grab another canvas and start painting on that one, I some times paint 2 -4 paintings at the same time since I have to wait for one to dry to keep on going. 
I turn the lights off and turn on the black light and I start to add more paint on the canvas. My work is very much based on emotions and my perspective on reality, sex, lust, desire and love. Which I use the light as a medium to help portray . This process will take days,weeks,months to finish...some times I feel like it's never finished. 
Time passes by and day time becomes night and I'm still in the studio. A few sexy models come by and keep me company and chat about life and everything in between. Some times we have some great sex, it helps to get me inspired. 
Some times I just go out to some bars or clubs to get inspired to see people and be around them, what can I say I'm a people person. Some times I go to some museums to get inspired and see some great masters and some times I just have to walk down the street and see some great art. 




q) Where did you grow up/where do you live now and how does that contribute to your art?




a)Very good question, I'm a man of the world. Was born in New York City then this is when things get complicated, I lived in Torremolinos Spain and then lived in Stanford Connecticut , my aunt and uncle had a place on 38th and 1 in Manhattan as well so I was back and forth between New York and Connecticut. They also moved to Old Greenwich for a little bit before moving to Boca Raton Florida. At that time I then moved to Dominican Republic with my mother for a few years then moved to Boca Raton with my aunt and uncle until they couldn't handle me and I was sent to boarding school in Long Island. 
They ended up moving back up to Connecticut and buying a new apartment on 116 Central Park south, which was where i stayed when I had open weekends, which means when I could go home. I after high school I ended up going to temple university for international business and Latin American studies in Philadelphia. After three years I dropped out of college and went down to Orlando to be with my dying mother. After I was spotted to model and ended up in New York City  which is where I still live now. And to answer you question the answer is "yes" all this moving and traveling has influenced me in many ways 




q) What is your earliest memory that propelled you to create?




a)I still remember , running around my mother's apartment and painting on the walls, and hiding it with white toothpaste,come on of course that makes sense to a 4 year old." My mom won't see it if it's covered in tooth paste...right." Well she would see it and it was a slap on my butt...being a rebel is still happening to this day...I just do it in a wiser way. I really started painting seriously when I got out of jail if you want to hear more about it send me an email eddybogaert007@gmail.com lll reply back to you and tell you more about it if your interested 




q) Tell us a little bit about your creative process.




a)It all starts with a thought a word a sentence that will be the beginning of the art piece. Then comes the magic, my mind goes a million miles an hour and I think of everything and nothing at the same times creating chaos in its purest form but the i slow down and add symbolism and matter and turn the lights off and turn the black lights on and start over and this might go for months or says or hours but at the end of my process I feel like there is balance in my work, hence my style is called " chaotic balance" 



q) How do you wish for your art to be perceived? 



a)My art can be perceived in many ways since I combine different elements that at times contradict. I mix abstract expressionist , and Pop-art and street art all mixed into one so in short you can perceive it in more ways than one , im just showing you the door and asking it to open it. 



q) What do your internal dialogues sound like?



a)My internal dialogue sounds like an erotic movie in where the woman is climaxing and scratching her partners back. As she moans louder and louder then she sees my face. And falls in love at end. That's how I want you to feel when you see my art work.



q) Do you feel that there are limitations to what you want to create?



a)No ,the mind is limitless and the soul is eternal ,so when combined together and it creates art so I might not be able to make the 16 chapels, in what the world in a box might think of it but I can create something like it in my own mind.



q) Do you feel art is vital to survival and if so, why?



a)I painted all my life, just didn't think that I would wake up one day and say " this is is what I am going todo for the rest of my life..." I did it as a hobby ,just for the love of it. Nevertheless, it became a real part of me when I came out of jail. I had all this pent up frustration, sadness an anger because I felt that I was judged unfairly and that I was in jail for a petty crime, don't get me wrong I am feeling really sad for my action but I didn't think it had to be punished this badly. So I painted to dilute the anger and sadness and frustration and it helped, it helped even better when people started to buy my art. Now it's totally the opposite it's happier and much more vivid and I have to thank art for helping me get through the tough times. It's been my heart, my brain and the reason to wake up every day.



q) Describe a world without art.



a)Have you seen the movie  equilibrium ? A world without emotions that's what I think the world would look like ...people walking around like zombies it's sad to even fathom a world that art is null because I Imagen it will regress us an erase the essence of what being human is.



q) Tell us a secret, and obsession.



a)I just finished fucking the living hell out of my girl, and her wife doesn't mind that's a little secret. My obsession is people I'm very gregarious and love being around people, I guess since I'm a only child without a father or a mother I guess that's why I am very interested in humanity and trying to help as much as I can




q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?



&




 Instagram @eddybogaert007








My art fan page 


Instagram 
@eddybogaert007


Website





venerdì 6 febbraio 2015

BERNARD DEMENGE

BERNARD DEMENGE

http://boitegrimace.blogspot.fr/








martedì 25 novembre 2014

Interview with JOHAN KLEINJAN






q)Walk us through an intimate day in your life


a)Get up and wish I got up a bit earlier. Take a shower and have breakfast while listening to dutch talk radio. Go to my studio to work on new drawings or paintings and get distracted by internet. Recieve a call from a friend about stressful work, find out music people think i'm a teacher and accidentally get a great new idea for a new hip hop project.
Go to the other side of the city on my bicycle to get a roll of film developed, return to the studio and overhear someone in an other studio talking very loudly about pregnant prostitutes. Work some more and return home to cook or eat out with my girlfriend. Work some more at night and maybe watch a motorcycle gang series before going to sleep.,


q) Where did you grow up/where do you live now and how does that contribute to your art?


a)I grew up in a village called Zuid-Beijerland, close to Rotterdam in The Netherlands. Because my village and the surrounding villages were so small, all the kids from those places were put in the same class in high school. That's why there were lots of trashy, strange kids in my class who were very nice to draw. But somehow I was too stupid to finish high school and ended up in a technical school in Rotterdam. There I met more strange characters, like young moroccan drug dealers trying to sell me tasers, guys making their own guns, and a part-time croupier with a big sword. This all seemed very nice until I had to actually start working. Then I tried to escape to whatever art school that was willing to accept me, so I ended up in Rotterdam, where I still live.


q) What is your earliest memory that propelled you to create?


a)Lego propelled me to create and wanting to become a car designer, so I did more constructing then drawing. I only started drawing in my observational style when I met my superkrisis classmates in high school.


q) Tell us a little bit about your creative process.


a)If there is something or someone interesting around I start drawing in a cheap notebook. (At the moment I use notebooks made of blank yellow papers, because that kind of paper sucks up the in very nicely.) If its gone too fast or whatever I take a picture. In the studio it take more time to start working, because most of the time I combine various source-pictures in one drawing.


q) How do you wish for your art to be perceived?


a)I hope people will see the world around them a bit different after viewing my krisis people and skewed environments.


q) What do your internal dialogues sound like?


a)Ok, I'll finish this painting., Mmm what's happening on facebook,, ah! I should work on.,  …..................  Ai , there is still one drawing  to upload on tumblr,. Ok , work on … …..... . .. .  . Mmm, interesting race-bike wheels, buy new tires as well? How much are the shipping costs compared to this other shop?... stop! work on! ..Maybe it's easier to start with dark colors first and add lighter ones on top instead of the other way around.. Should I make this next one on paper or panel...?  Can I still find the pictures I need? , , , Aah, It's already 14:00. Aaagh, this gouache stinks, why do some colors start rotting while others stay fresh? Maybe if I let them dry they will stop stinking... 



q) Do you feel that there are limitations to what you want to create?


a)It's mostly a lack of time and an abundance of distractions that limit me.

q) Do you feel art is vital to survival and if so, why?

Mmm, for survival maybe only food and shelter are vital. But for me it's an important part of my life, as I'm always drawing of making things.,


q) Describe a world without art.


a)It probably won't look so different, only museums and art schools would be shopping malls or hotels, and galleries would be shops. But if all art is gone, people will immediately start making new work, except maybe when there is a worldwide dictatorship and all art is banned, but then artists can always go underground..



q) Tell us a secret, and obsession.


a)I am an otaku of everything

q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?

On my website, and new drawings and other small stuff on my tumblr




giovedì 22 agosto 2013

Interview with BRANDON JUHASZ






q)Walk us through an intimate day in your life


a)being an artist today especially an “emerging” artist is a juggled life. I work a full time job. When I get up I pretty much go to work. I work till early afternoon and then come home to my live/studio space and go about normally life with my family. I work mostly at night unless I have pressing deadlines in which I work whenever I have the free time/all the time. I marry my life and my practice so that whenever I have a moment or the quick need to make something or complete something my studio and work is only a room away. It works for me to integrate that way rather than having a separate studio to escape too and spend hours holed up.


q) Where did you grow up/where do you live now and how does that contribute to your art?


a)I live in Cleveland Ohio where I grew up. I recently had children and family is important to me so I moved back to my hometown. I like it. I find comfort in the history and the connection. My work is very humanistic and about the experience of life so participating in a relatively normal life only feeds to my inspiration and narratives.


q) What is your earliest memory that propelled you to create?


a)I always was a sketcher and people always responded to it. That attention sort of shapes you much the way a good athlete is promoted at a young age. You realize that something you like to do you are actually good at and it drives you to do it more. Although I doubt I could have stopped. Life throws curves at you all the time and art has at times stopped for me but like a boomerang it is the urge that never goes away. It is inside.


q) Tell us a little bit about your creative process.


a)I first started responding to the nature and power of photographs by making pictures from photographs I found online. Folded paper dioramas that I rephotographed to make a sort of simulacrum, a photograph of a photograph. I really tried to fool the viewer into thinking the subject was real. My take on the photo as truth debate or thinking about image as object. As I worked through my process I started liking the “crappy” aspect of my sculptures and how I really could tell a story through the paper pieces. Much like a painter would construct a painting I would make elaborate scenes out of paper/photographs and cardboard and then photograph them. The result was a strange awkward filtered reality. It played well into my thinking about the nature of photography and its ability to satisfy us as experience and memory. The filtering creates a strange world that we as a society have come to accept as standard. I really love the intersection of fantasy and reality. Recently I have been drawn to just using the sculptures and displaying them as a tableaux. I have become better at making them and they really stand on their own as powerful objects.


q) How do you wish for your art to be perceived?


a)I have a really good sense of humor. I feel humor is not silly it really is about sadness and duality. I want my work to be inviting but unsettling.


q) What do your internal dialogues sound like?


a)I doubt everything. Art school does that to you, forces you to be critical. I’ve learned lately though to trust myself and to know when something doesn’t work and to be okay with failure. But I am always asking myself “does this work”. Also I am always observing and participating in all life has to offer. It is were the inspirations come from. For me art has to come from life.


q) Do you feel that there are limitations to what you want to create?


a)Sure. I am limited to what I can make from the paper. But then often times I surprise myself with what I can make.


q) Do you feel art is vital to survival and if so, why?


a)Not really. I will always create and communication is vital but art plays a funny role these days. Life is so rich and textured, art is just a small piece of the grand view.


q) Describe a world without art.


a)Art is everywhere and not just the gallery high art, capital A art. It is so many things. I would imagine without art things would be pretty dull.


q) Tell us a secret, and obsession.


a)I love bad television and terrible pop music.


q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?




mercoledì 3 luglio 2013

Interview with Eran Fowler






q) Walk us through an intimate day in your life


a) I work from home as a freelance illustrator, along with my partner who does remote tech support for a living. We make meals together, and work beside each other at our computers. I’m pretty fortunate to be able to have such a comfortable work-day, and it should allow us a lot of freedom whenever we decide to start a family.


q) Where did you grow up/where do you live now and how does that contribute to your art?


a) I was born in southern California, and grew up in a military family. Most of my childhood was spent on military bases all over the world. I like to think it’s given me a broader perspective about the world, and the diversity of people in it. I’ve ended up in Vancouver, Canada, which has some of the best sushi I’ve ever eaten.


q) What is your earliest memory that propelled you to create?


a) I wanted to see the stories in my head become real. The next best thing was to make them visible.


q) Tell us a little bit about your creative process.


a) I tend to work very conceptually. Most of my illustrations start off as ideas or messages that I want to express somehow, and must find a way to represent those ideas visually.


q) How do you wish for your art to be perceived?


a) I think that’s up to the viewer. I try to put a lot of symbolism into my work for people to unpack, but ultimately they’ll bring more ideas to the table than I could ever put into it or anticipate on my own.


q) What do your internal dialogues sound like?


a) Absolutely inane, I assure you. For instance, I’m currently enduring a heat-wave by thinking about how much nicer it is than a zombie apocalypse.


q) Do you feel that there are limitations to what you want to create?


a) Only the ones I impose on myself. If it’s out there, it can be learned.


q) Do you feel art is vital to survival and if so, why?


a) It’s more an incidental consequence of survival. Our creative impulses are what have allowed us to invent and remake the world around us. Art is just one of the ways we exorcise those instincts. More importantly, it is vital to culture, in much the way that the madness of dreams allow us to be sane when awake.


q) Describe a world without art.


a) A world without art HAS no description. That would be the problem.


q) Tell us a secret, and obsession.


a) I once broke one of my mom’s clay sculptures and blamed it on the neighbor kid. She’d said she was done with it, which I interpreted to mean she was getting rid of it, which sounded like a great opportunity to have fun smashing it. Oops.
And I am obsessed with bottles and boxes. I collect them compulsively. I keep telling myself I’ll use them for something, but mostly they just take up space on my shelves.


q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?



a) They can see my portfolio at eranfolio.com, or they can follow my new stuff at either of the following:
http://eranfolio.deviantart.com/
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Eran-Fowler-Illustration/518704834838608

mercoledì 10 aprile 2013

Interview with KwangHo Shin







q)please tell us a brief info about yourself.


a)I am a Korean artist who do art.


q)please tell us a brief info about yourself.


a) When I was 7, I got shocked about creation by the cartoon that my cousin drew. The passion of creation, instead of the thinking of being an artist, made myself.


q)What are your tools of the trade and why?


a) I usually use oil paint or acrylic paint, but I'm trying to use variety materials in needs. I'm also planning to do sculptures in this year. I think the tools are just the way to transmit, so they should not be the purpose of art.


q)Who or what gives you inspiration on your morbid art?


a) All people around me, and myself. The complicated emotions that I feel through people are my motive.


q)Is your artistic background self-taught or did you go to college to study?


a) I studied fine art in art college.


q)How do you keep “fresh” within your industry?


a) I just forget about last artworks. I just do art without plans.


q)What are some of your current projects?


a) Most of current works are oil paintings, but I'm thinking of many kinds of works.


q)Which of your works are you the most proud of? And why?


a) Painting, [1]. It's better to say that it's the first paiting that I've done when I got back to Korea from Germany. There's no specific reason.


q)Are there any areas, techniques, mediums, projects in your field that you have yet to try?


a) I'm planning of many kinds of art, but I'm not afford to do that yet. Sculpting and video art.


q)What do you do to keep yourself motivated and avoid burn-out?


a) I just live in my studio and it's my daily. And I look a lot of young artists' works on internet.


q)how do you spend most of your free time?


a) Almost everyday is my free time. I usually spend time at my studio if I don't have any special schedule.


q)What contemporary artists or developments in art interest you?


a) Alex Kanevsky, Antony Micallef, Amazing Works, and Justin Mortimer.


q)We really like some of your pictures, how can we get our hands on them? Do you sell them? How?


a) They are being sold on Saatchi online, or you can trade with me directly through e-mail or Facebook. It's better for me to trade directly with me, honestly.

mercoledì 6 febbraio 2013

Interview with Eric Mistretta






q)For the people who don't know your work - how would you describe it ?

a)It’s like a hangover after a party, when you have to start drinking again to avoid feeling sick.



q)What are the key themes running through your practice?

a)Most of the work addresses themes of romance, sexuality, nostalgia and a sense of the absurd. These themes can be articulated through implied narratives or the juxtaposition of pre-existing materials and objects.



q)Your favorite place on earth?

a)I like watching dumb TV shows with my girlfriend while laying on my pullout couch. Also, during the winter I love the Corner Bistro in NYC. Eating cheeseburgers and drinking cheap beer and watching people walk in the snow.



q)What influences your work?

a)My work is mainly influenced by strange things I witness just walking around. In New York City, the things you see can be very bizarre - in a David Lynch sort of way - and that kind of absurdity inspires me the most. Like a guy dancing with a garbage can, or a child on a leash.



q)What music are you into right now?

a)Lately I really enjoy listening to boring talk radio shows. And always The White Stripes and Nine Inch Nails.



q)Describe your thought & design process...

a)Usually the idea for a piece will come from a particular object that I find. If I’m out looking for materials, I see things that register as having potential for a work. Whether it’s an old piece of furniture or a weird dress or a large dog bone or something. So I try to acquire the materials and then let the idea develop afterwards.


q)Which emerging artists are you looking forward to seeing more of?

a)Andrew Brischler is a young painter from NYC. And also Austin Lee, another young artist who studies at Yale and makes very weird paintings. And Jayson Musson, who turns sweaters into art. Also Cassandra Levine, who is studying at the School of Visual Arts.



q)Favorite place on the internet?

a)I like looking at pictures of weird animals on google. And now that I am in Florence for a few months, I’m writing about all of the amazing food on my blog:
www.openwideny.com.



q)Do you have any upcoming projects/exhibitions we should know about?

a)I currently have work in an awesome group show called Deep Cuts, curated by Wendy White and David Humphrey at the Anna Kustera Gallery in NYC. I’m also incredibly excited about my upcoming solo exhibition on April 30th at the F_AIR Gallery in Florence, where I am the artist in residence.



q)Tell us something we don't know - but should...

a)I’m working on a couple of short videos for people that will be out soon. One is a promo video for Joyce Pensato’s upcoming solo exhibition at the Santa Monica Museum of Art. The other is a happy birthday video celebrating the one year anniversary of Maurizio Cattelan and Massimiliano Gioni’s Family Business Gallery in NYC.



q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?

a)Images of my work are on my website
www.ericmistretta.com. And if you like food, which most people do, check out my blog www.openwideny.com.