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martedì 25 novembre 2014

Interview with JOHAN KLEINJAN






q)Walk us through an intimate day in your life


a)Get up and wish I got up a bit earlier. Take a shower and have breakfast while listening to dutch talk radio. Go to my studio to work on new drawings or paintings and get distracted by internet. Recieve a call from a friend about stressful work, find out music people think i'm a teacher and accidentally get a great new idea for a new hip hop project.
Go to the other side of the city on my bicycle to get a roll of film developed, return to the studio and overhear someone in an other studio talking very loudly about pregnant prostitutes. Work some more and return home to cook or eat out with my girlfriend. Work some more at night and maybe watch a motorcycle gang series before going to sleep.,


q) Where did you grow up/where do you live now and how does that contribute to your art?


a)I grew up in a village called Zuid-Beijerland, close to Rotterdam in The Netherlands. Because my village and the surrounding villages were so small, all the kids from those places were put in the same class in high school. That's why there were lots of trashy, strange kids in my class who were very nice to draw. But somehow I was too stupid to finish high school and ended up in a technical school in Rotterdam. There I met more strange characters, like young moroccan drug dealers trying to sell me tasers, guys making their own guns, and a part-time croupier with a big sword. This all seemed very nice until I had to actually start working. Then I tried to escape to whatever art school that was willing to accept me, so I ended up in Rotterdam, where I still live.


q) What is your earliest memory that propelled you to create?


a)Lego propelled me to create and wanting to become a car designer, so I did more constructing then drawing. I only started drawing in my observational style when I met my superkrisis classmates in high school.


q) Tell us a little bit about your creative process.


a)If there is something or someone interesting around I start drawing in a cheap notebook. (At the moment I use notebooks made of blank yellow papers, because that kind of paper sucks up the in very nicely.) If its gone too fast or whatever I take a picture. In the studio it take more time to start working, because most of the time I combine various source-pictures in one drawing.


q) How do you wish for your art to be perceived?


a)I hope people will see the world around them a bit different after viewing my krisis people and skewed environments.


q) What do your internal dialogues sound like?


a)Ok, I'll finish this painting., Mmm what's happening on facebook,, ah! I should work on.,  …..................  Ai , there is still one drawing  to upload on tumblr,. Ok , work on … …..... . .. .  . Mmm, interesting race-bike wheels, buy new tires as well? How much are the shipping costs compared to this other shop?... stop! work on! ..Maybe it's easier to start with dark colors first and add lighter ones on top instead of the other way around.. Should I make this next one on paper or panel...?  Can I still find the pictures I need? , , , Aah, It's already 14:00. Aaagh, this gouache stinks, why do some colors start rotting while others stay fresh? Maybe if I let them dry they will stop stinking... 



q) Do you feel that there are limitations to what you want to create?


a)It's mostly a lack of time and an abundance of distractions that limit me.

q) Do you feel art is vital to survival and if so, why?

Mmm, for survival maybe only food and shelter are vital. But for me it's an important part of my life, as I'm always drawing of making things.,


q) Describe a world without art.


a)It probably won't look so different, only museums and art schools would be shopping malls or hotels, and galleries would be shops. But if all art is gone, people will immediately start making new work, except maybe when there is a worldwide dictatorship and all art is banned, but then artists can always go underground..



q) Tell us a secret, and obsession.


a)I am an otaku of everything

q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?

On my website, and new drawings and other small stuff on my tumblr




giovedì 22 agosto 2013

Interview with BRANDON JUHASZ






q)Walk us through an intimate day in your life


a)being an artist today especially an “emerging” artist is a juggled life. I work a full time job. When I get up I pretty much go to work. I work till early afternoon and then come home to my live/studio space and go about normally life with my family. I work mostly at night unless I have pressing deadlines in which I work whenever I have the free time/all the time. I marry my life and my practice so that whenever I have a moment or the quick need to make something or complete something my studio and work is only a room away. It works for me to integrate that way rather than having a separate studio to escape too and spend hours holed up.


q) Where did you grow up/where do you live now and how does that contribute to your art?


a)I live in Cleveland Ohio where I grew up. I recently had children and family is important to me so I moved back to my hometown. I like it. I find comfort in the history and the connection. My work is very humanistic and about the experience of life so participating in a relatively normal life only feeds to my inspiration and narratives.


q) What is your earliest memory that propelled you to create?


a)I always was a sketcher and people always responded to it. That attention sort of shapes you much the way a good athlete is promoted at a young age. You realize that something you like to do you are actually good at and it drives you to do it more. Although I doubt I could have stopped. Life throws curves at you all the time and art has at times stopped for me but like a boomerang it is the urge that never goes away. It is inside.


q) Tell us a little bit about your creative process.


a)I first started responding to the nature and power of photographs by making pictures from photographs I found online. Folded paper dioramas that I rephotographed to make a sort of simulacrum, a photograph of a photograph. I really tried to fool the viewer into thinking the subject was real. My take on the photo as truth debate or thinking about image as object. As I worked through my process I started liking the “crappy” aspect of my sculptures and how I really could tell a story through the paper pieces. Much like a painter would construct a painting I would make elaborate scenes out of paper/photographs and cardboard and then photograph them. The result was a strange awkward filtered reality. It played well into my thinking about the nature of photography and its ability to satisfy us as experience and memory. The filtering creates a strange world that we as a society have come to accept as standard. I really love the intersection of fantasy and reality. Recently I have been drawn to just using the sculptures and displaying them as a tableaux. I have become better at making them and they really stand on their own as powerful objects.


q) How do you wish for your art to be perceived?


a)I have a really good sense of humor. I feel humor is not silly it really is about sadness and duality. I want my work to be inviting but unsettling.


q) What do your internal dialogues sound like?


a)I doubt everything. Art school does that to you, forces you to be critical. I’ve learned lately though to trust myself and to know when something doesn’t work and to be okay with failure. But I am always asking myself “does this work”. Also I am always observing and participating in all life has to offer. It is were the inspirations come from. For me art has to come from life.


q) Do you feel that there are limitations to what you want to create?


a)Sure. I am limited to what I can make from the paper. But then often times I surprise myself with what I can make.


q) Do you feel art is vital to survival and if so, why?


a)Not really. I will always create and communication is vital but art plays a funny role these days. Life is so rich and textured, art is just a small piece of the grand view.


q) Describe a world without art.


a)Art is everywhere and not just the gallery high art, capital A art. It is so many things. I would imagine without art things would be pretty dull.


q) Tell us a secret, and obsession.


a)I love bad television and terrible pop music.


q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?




mercoledì 3 luglio 2013

Interview with Eran Fowler






q) Walk us through an intimate day in your life


a) I work from home as a freelance illustrator, along with my partner who does remote tech support for a living. We make meals together, and work beside each other at our computers. I’m pretty fortunate to be able to have such a comfortable work-day, and it should allow us a lot of freedom whenever we decide to start a family.


q) Where did you grow up/where do you live now and how does that contribute to your art?


a) I was born in southern California, and grew up in a military family. Most of my childhood was spent on military bases all over the world. I like to think it’s given me a broader perspective about the world, and the diversity of people in it. I’ve ended up in Vancouver, Canada, which has some of the best sushi I’ve ever eaten.


q) What is your earliest memory that propelled you to create?


a) I wanted to see the stories in my head become real. The next best thing was to make them visible.


q) Tell us a little bit about your creative process.


a) I tend to work very conceptually. Most of my illustrations start off as ideas or messages that I want to express somehow, and must find a way to represent those ideas visually.


q) How do you wish for your art to be perceived?


a) I think that’s up to the viewer. I try to put a lot of symbolism into my work for people to unpack, but ultimately they’ll bring more ideas to the table than I could ever put into it or anticipate on my own.


q) What do your internal dialogues sound like?


a) Absolutely inane, I assure you. For instance, I’m currently enduring a heat-wave by thinking about how much nicer it is than a zombie apocalypse.


q) Do you feel that there are limitations to what you want to create?


a) Only the ones I impose on myself. If it’s out there, it can be learned.


q) Do you feel art is vital to survival and if so, why?


a) It’s more an incidental consequence of survival. Our creative impulses are what have allowed us to invent and remake the world around us. Art is just one of the ways we exorcise those instincts. More importantly, it is vital to culture, in much the way that the madness of dreams allow us to be sane when awake.


q) Describe a world without art.


a) A world without art HAS no description. That would be the problem.


q) Tell us a secret, and obsession.


a) I once broke one of my mom’s clay sculptures and blamed it on the neighbor kid. She’d said she was done with it, which I interpreted to mean she was getting rid of it, which sounded like a great opportunity to have fun smashing it. Oops.
And I am obsessed with bottles and boxes. I collect them compulsively. I keep telling myself I’ll use them for something, but mostly they just take up space on my shelves.


q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?



a) They can see my portfolio at eranfolio.com, or they can follow my new stuff at either of the following:
http://eranfolio.deviantart.com/
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Eran-Fowler-Illustration/518704834838608

mercoledì 10 aprile 2013

Interview with KwangHo Shin







q)please tell us a brief info about yourself.


a)I am a Korean artist who do art.


q)please tell us a brief info about yourself.


a) When I was 7, I got shocked about creation by the cartoon that my cousin drew. The passion of creation, instead of the thinking of being an artist, made myself.


q)What are your tools of the trade and why?


a) I usually use oil paint or acrylic paint, but I'm trying to use variety materials in needs. I'm also planning to do sculptures in this year. I think the tools are just the way to transmit, so they should not be the purpose of art.


q)Who or what gives you inspiration on your morbid art?


a) All people around me, and myself. The complicated emotions that I feel through people are my motive.


q)Is your artistic background self-taught or did you go to college to study?


a) I studied fine art in art college.


q)How do you keep “fresh” within your industry?


a) I just forget about last artworks. I just do art without plans.


q)What are some of your current projects?


a) Most of current works are oil paintings, but I'm thinking of many kinds of works.


q)Which of your works are you the most proud of? And why?


a) Painting, [1]. It's better to say that it's the first paiting that I've done when I got back to Korea from Germany. There's no specific reason.


q)Are there any areas, techniques, mediums, projects in your field that you have yet to try?


a) I'm planning of many kinds of art, but I'm not afford to do that yet. Sculpting and video art.


q)What do you do to keep yourself motivated and avoid burn-out?


a) I just live in my studio and it's my daily. And I look a lot of young artists' works on internet.


q)how do you spend most of your free time?


a) Almost everyday is my free time. I usually spend time at my studio if I don't have any special schedule.


q)What contemporary artists or developments in art interest you?


a) Alex Kanevsky, Antony Micallef, Amazing Works, and Justin Mortimer.


q)We really like some of your pictures, how can we get our hands on them? Do you sell them? How?


a) They are being sold on Saatchi online, or you can trade with me directly through e-mail or Facebook. It's better for me to trade directly with me, honestly.

mercoledì 6 febbraio 2013

Interview with Eric Mistretta






q)For the people who don't know your work - how would you describe it ?

a)It’s like a hangover after a party, when you have to start drinking again to avoid feeling sick.



q)What are the key themes running through your practice?

a)Most of the work addresses themes of romance, sexuality, nostalgia and a sense of the absurd. These themes can be articulated through implied narratives or the juxtaposition of pre-existing materials and objects.



q)Your favorite place on earth?

a)I like watching dumb TV shows with my girlfriend while laying on my pullout couch. Also, during the winter I love the Corner Bistro in NYC. Eating cheeseburgers and drinking cheap beer and watching people walk in the snow.



q)What influences your work?

a)My work is mainly influenced by strange things I witness just walking around. In New York City, the things you see can be very bizarre - in a David Lynch sort of way - and that kind of absurdity inspires me the most. Like a guy dancing with a garbage can, or a child on a leash.



q)What music are you into right now?

a)Lately I really enjoy listening to boring talk radio shows. And always The White Stripes and Nine Inch Nails.



q)Describe your thought & design process...

a)Usually the idea for a piece will come from a particular object that I find. If I’m out looking for materials, I see things that register as having potential for a work. Whether it’s an old piece of furniture or a weird dress or a large dog bone or something. So I try to acquire the materials and then let the idea develop afterwards.


q)Which emerging artists are you looking forward to seeing more of?

a)Andrew Brischler is a young painter from NYC. And also Austin Lee, another young artist who studies at Yale and makes very weird paintings. And Jayson Musson, who turns sweaters into art. Also Cassandra Levine, who is studying at the School of Visual Arts.



q)Favorite place on the internet?

a)I like looking at pictures of weird animals on google. And now that I am in Florence for a few months, I’m writing about all of the amazing food on my blog:
www.openwideny.com.



q)Do you have any upcoming projects/exhibitions we should know about?

a)I currently have work in an awesome group show called Deep Cuts, curated by Wendy White and David Humphrey at the Anna Kustera Gallery in NYC. I’m also incredibly excited about my upcoming solo exhibition on April 30th at the F_AIR Gallery in Florence, where I am the artist in residence.



q)Tell us something we don't know - but should...

a)I’m working on a couple of short videos for people that will be out soon. One is a promo video for Joyce Pensato’s upcoming solo exhibition at the Santa Monica Museum of Art. The other is a happy birthday video celebrating the one year anniversary of Maurizio Cattelan and Massimiliano Gioni’s Family Business Gallery in NYC.



q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?

a)Images of my work are on my website
www.ericmistretta.com. And if you like food, which most people do, check out my blog www.openwideny.com.

giovedì 8 novembre 2012

Interview with Ben Venom






q)For the people who don't know your work - how would you describe it ?

a)I’m interested in juxtaposing traditional handmade crafts with extreme elements found on the fringes of society. My work can be described as opposing forces colliding at lightening speed. Imagery found in Heavy Metal music, the Occult, and Motorcycle Gangs are stitched together with recycled materials using techniques usually relegated to your Grandmothers sewing circle. Serious, yet attempting to take on a B movie Horror film style where ridiculousness becomes genius. The question remains… Can I play with madness?

q)What are the key themes running through your practice?

a)Some of my more recent pieces are heavily influenced from tattoos and certain aspects of biker gang culture. The majority of the work borrows from the Occult, Mysticism, and Music. 

q)Your favorite place on earth?

a)San Francisco, CA

q)What influences your work?

a)Reading books and researching ideas on the internet.

q)What music are you into right now?

a)The new Baroness album Green / Yellow , YOB, Hazzards Cure, Zoroaster, Acid King, Black Cobra, Kylesa, Red Fang

q)Describe your thought & design process...

a)The process begins with a hand drawn sketch transferred into photoshop for further manipulation and re-sizing. Each t-shirt is then hand cut to a corresponding piece within the overall design and appliquéed onto the top layer using my Juki F-600 sewing machine. The final step is to bind all layers of the piece by sewing the quilting stitch. In the end...even the beasts of Hell need a warm blanket to sleep with!


q)Which emerging artists are you looking forward to seeing more of?

a)Erin Riley, Bill McRight, Kevin Earl Taylor, Jeff Eisenberg...

q)Favorite place on the internet?

a)Netflix

q)Do you have any upcoming projects/exhibitions we should know about?

a)I will be exhibiting work at Circle Culture Gallery in Berlin, Germany and Milton Keynes Gallery in England in the next 2 months. My work is included in the book Milk and Honey: Contemporary Art of California that was just released via Ammo books and is now available through Barne and Noble or Amazon.comAmazon.com. Get This! Gallery will be exhibiting some of my quilts at the Aqua Art Miami fair in the early December. Check out HUCK Magazine: The Identity Issue....I have a small interview in there. 

q)Tell us something we don't know - but should...

a)I am a self-taught quilter and am still learning...Ha!

lunedì 29 ottobre 2012

Interview with Krys Fox






q)For the people who don't know your work - how would you describe it ?


a)It's always weird for me to describe my own art.. I guess cause I'm so close to it. I tend to shoot somewhere in between surrealism and realism. I like to add a stylized element to an emotional and/or gritty everyday reality. Mostly I shoot people, but always have my camera and try and create something new everyday.


q)What are the key themes running through your practice?


a)Lately it has been death actually.. ha. I've been shooting a 31 Days of Halloween series all this month of October.. recreating horror films and switching the characters gender, but trying to remain as close to the original films' tones, textures and emotion. I've also been shooting a series I call The Styx Series.. motivated by my love of Greek Mythology. It's a 500 shot project of people with totems over their eyes, in a death pose.. Every subject has different totems, locations and color schemes.. Creating (hopefully) a whimsical, vibrant quilt of life and death afterwards..
So death, and the beauty and uniqueness it can present.


q)Your favorite place on earth?


a)So far New York. It's like my other lover. I recently was in England though for an exhibition, and it changed my life. I am in love with the UK...and can't wait to return.
I also want to live in Africa in a tree house for a year... someday.


q)What influences your work?


a)Other artists/people i love inspire me and fill my creative well. I watch a lot of film, and many films/filmmakers inspire me. Nature and getting lost in it. And showers.. whenever I can't think of how to shoot someone, I often close my eyes in the shower and the image pops in my head like a hallucination.


q)What music are you into right now?


a)My favorite albums of the year have been Fiona Apple's newest and the new solo album by Dresden Doll singer Amanda Palmer. I am late to the party but have been into Sleigh Bells and Die Antword a lot too.
Fav Music is Morphine, Pixies, PJ Harvey and Thom Yorke.


q)Describe your thought & design process...


a)I think in angles.. Funny how math and I have never been a good match. But I naturally see images in angles. I storyboard images about half the time (my shower hallucinations) and the other half is improvised during the shoot. Design is the same way.. half planned to a tee and half pulled out of my ass.


q)Which emerging artists are you looking forward to seeing more of?


a)I love Al Benkin's painting and installations. Scooter LaForge endlessly inspires me. Designer Wren Britton's work is brilliant and very much in my macabre/whimsical sensibility.


q)Favorite place on the internet?


a)Is it douchey to say my fan page on Facebook? I love the feedback and enthusiasm of my fans.. It keeps me going when I feel like a creative husk.


q)Do you have any upcoming projects/exhibitions we should know about?


a)I do! I'm exhibiting some new work at Tribes Gallery in NYC on November 8th (the day before my birthday ) and in the spring in Manchester, UK alongside (the awesome) Pam Van Damned.
I'm still shooting Styx Pictures daily, and cooking on a 31 Days of Halloween book.


q)Tell us something we don't know - but should...


a)I'm quite shy.. People assume cause i have tattoos and wear colorful clothes that I'm an extrovert, but I'm actually pretty introverted. I hate having my picture taken.. but seem to do it for others all the time. Karma I guess, due to all the things I make my models go through..